indielowercase asked: is there a reason chocolate milk is the hot new post-workout thing and not regular milk, besides marketing?

the-exercist:

Chocolate milk is so beneficial! Really. As a post-workout drink, it’s nearly ideal. 

Each cup of chocolate milk contains between 8 and 11 grams of protein. This begins the immediate process of repairing and building your muscle tissue back up. The 20-30 grams of carbs allows for a spike in insulin levels, which spurs your recovery and helps to replenish your energy stores. Drinking chocolate milk leads to a higher concentration of glycogen in your system, which helps with your future performance.

Not to mention that, when taken immediately after exercise, milk-based proteins promote greater muscle protein synthesis than soy-based proteins. The protein in cow’s milk is roughly made up of 80% casein protein content and 20% whey protein content. This is ideal since the whey is fast-acting, which lets amino acids to get right into the muscle tissue, while the casein can be digested more slowly, giving you a steady stream of amino acids over a longer period of time.

So consider introducing chocolate milk to your post-workout routine. It’s inexpensive and will certainly get the job done. 

Mmmm, chocolate milk. Delicious AND good for you post-workout.

motivationalbiden:

TGIF, folks, TGIF!

motivationalbiden:

TGIF, folks, TGIF!

the-exercist:

"Honestly, what is that extra hour rolling in your bed going to achieve compared to a solid workout?"
Let’s take a minute to talk about what sleep achieves:
Improved short-term and long-term memory
Lowered risk of infection
Lowered risk of heart disease
Lowered risk of diabetes
Increased life span
Decreased inflammation
Increased levels of creativity
Longer attention span and increased attentiveness
Increased efficiency of vaccinations
Regulation of hormones
Increased ability to balance a healthy bodyweight
Lowered stress levels
Decreased likelihood of depression or mood disorders
Giving up sleep in order to exercise is not an inherently good decision. You need that time to rest your body and recover from the day before. If you aren’t getting enough sleep, then increasing your activity is going to be incredibly dangerous. It can negatively impact both your mental wellbeing and your physical health. So giving up sleep in order to garner the benefits of exercise? That can be like shooting yourself in the foot.
Of course, there are a lot of cases where getting up a little early for exercise is going to be a good thing. This works well for some people. But there are just as many cases where getting up early would hurt someone. That extra hour might be completely necessary for their health. 
So don’t feel bullied into starting an early exercise schedule or cutting your sleep short so that you can get to the gym. The average person needs a solid 7-8 hours every night. Not 7-8 hours of tossing and turning, not lying in bed for 7-8 hours - Actually sleeping that long. If you’re consistently tired and don’t feel rested, then exercise will not inherently help you. Make sure you’re consciously evaluating your routine and know if getting up even earlier would bring some benefits. 
Resources: 
Huffington Post
NIH
Harvard.edu
WedMD
MUSCHealth

Yes, this.

the-exercist:

"Honestly, what is that extra hour rolling in your bed going to achieve compared to a solid workout?"

Let’s take a minute to talk about what sleep achieves:

  • Improved short-term and long-term memory
  • Lowered risk of infection
  • Lowered risk of heart disease
  • Lowered risk of diabetes
  • Increased life span
  • Decreased inflammation
  • Increased levels of creativity
  • Longer attention span and increased attentiveness
  • Increased efficiency of vaccinations
  • Regulation of hormones
  • Increased ability to balance a healthy bodyweight
  • Lowered stress levels
  • Decreased likelihood of depression or mood disorders

Giving up sleep in order to exercise is not an inherently good decision. You need that time to rest your body and recover from the day before. If you aren’t getting enough sleep, then increasing your activity is going to be incredibly dangerous. It can negatively impact both your mental wellbeing and your physical health. So giving up sleep in order to garner the benefits of exercise? That can be like shooting yourself in the foot.

Of course, there are a lot of cases where getting up a little early for exercise is going to be a good thing. This works well for some people. But there are just as many cases where getting up early would hurt someone. That extra hour might be completely necessary for their health. 

So don’t feel bullied into starting an early exercise schedule or cutting your sleep short so that you can get to the gym. The average person needs a solid 7-8 hours every night. Not 7-8 hours of tossing and turning, not lying in bed for 7-8 hours - Actually sleeping that long. If you’re consistently tired and don’t feel rested, then exercise will not inherently help you. Make sure you’re consciously evaluating your routine and know if getting up even earlier would bring some benefits. 

Resources: 

Yes, this.

(Source: fit-and-hip)

brunchandbooks:

the-exercist:

Stop apologizing for your abilities.

No more of this “I only ran 4 miles, it’s not much, but it’s all I could do.”

And no more “I just squatted with the bar, I know it’s not very heavy.”

Who are you apologizing to? So what if your workout isn’t on par with someone else’s?…

I feel this is true for everything in life. If you’re working, there is no “just.”

Yes.

(Source: fitocracy, via fitocracy)

I should seriously have a degree in counseling.

I should seriously have a degree in counseling.

unpopulaur:

"You should smile more!"

image

"You look tired!"

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"Are you really going to eat all that?"

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Is it that time of month?

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"You’re just being dramatic"

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"You have terrible taste"

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"Just exercise and eat less!"

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"Thats really slutty"

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"I love Robin Thicke!"

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the possibilities are endless!

(via brunchandbooks)

nbcnews:

Diet drinks linked with heart disease, death
(Photo: msnbc.com)
Women who drink the most diet sodas may also be more likely to develop heart disease and even to die, according to a new study published Saturday.
Continue reading

Please stop drinking this stuff—or if you must, cut way back.

nbcnews:

Diet drinks linked with heart disease, death

(Photo: msnbc.com)

Women who drink the most diet sodas may also be more likely to develop heart disease and even to die, according to a new study published Saturday.

Continue reading

Please stop drinking this stuff—or if you must, cut way back.

(Source: NBCNews.com, via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

simplefitlife:

Pretty Much.

simplefitlife:

Pretty Much.

(via fitnessandfeminism)